En 1 triángulo, que será la matriz de los calados, hay que medir el eje o centro de la hipotenusa, que es el lado más largo y que está opuesto al ángulo recto. En este caso el eje es 27 cm. Desde ese punto trazar 2 líneas hacia los catetos, que son los lados menores y que conforman el ángulo recto. Estas 2 líneas llegarán también al centro de los catetos, formando un cuadrado al interior del triángulo. Medir 6,5 mm a cualquier lado de estas líneas, y hacer una segunda marca. El largo de cada calado tiene que ser 10,5 cm y parte desde la hipotenusa
Del mismo modo y seguramente por imitación desde muy niño empecé a realizar mis propios proyectos. Al principio eran simples juguetes de madera o inocentes artefactos de guerra infantil. Como me gustaba el oficio de trabajar la madera, a los 13 años inicié los estudios de carpintería en un colegio. Eran muy pocas horas de taller y mucha teoría sin aplicación práctica. Sigo pensando que muchos de esos datos no eran necesarios para aprender el oficio, y los que sí lo eran, solo aprendí a memorizarlos y no a utilizarlos en casos prácticos. Creo que esto es algo fundamental para conseguir abrir tu mente, ver cualquier oficio desde una perspectiva diferente y llegar a solucionar problemas por ti mismo. Por eso y porque estaba en plena adolescencia terminé por desanimarme y después de cuatro años dejé los estudios. Junto con unos pequeños cursos de diseño asistido por ordenador esta fue mi única incursión en la enseñanza.
Not long ago, I needed to make some angled wood parts to build a new soffit on my garage. I didn’t have the customary tool for the job, but I had some steel joining plates. I screwed through one of the holes in the plate, set my angle, then added another screw to lock the angle. I could then use it as a template to mark all the pieces at the same angle and cut them with my circular saw. — Ryan Bartsch

Pocket screw joinery is a system—employing special drill and driver bits—used to join boards or pieces of plywood to one another. Installing pocket screws involves using a jig to drill a sharply angled, 15-degree hole through the back of one board, then driving a special screw through that hole into the second board to draw them tightly together. Learn how to use pocket screws here. It’s often used in cabinetmaking and furniture building. Here’s how to build cabinets with pocket screws. The term “pocket” comes from the design of the hole which contains an upper “pocket” for the head of the screw to push against; this pocket also hides the head of the screw.
There is significant evidence of advanced woodworking in ancient Egypt.[1] Woodworking is depicted in many extant ancient Egyptian drawings, and a considerable amount of ancient Egyptian furniture (such as stools, chairs, tables, beds, chests) has been preserved. Tombs represent a large collection of these artefacts and the inner coffins found in the tombs were also made of wood. The metal used by the Egyptians for woodworking tools was originally copper and eventually, after 2000 BC bronze as ironworking was unknown until much later.[2]
Sanding small items is tricky, as they’re hard to clamp in a vise to work on them. So instead of bringing the sandpaper to the workpiece, I bring the workpiece to the sandpaper. I glue sheets of sandpaper to a piece of plywood; 60 and 100-grit on one side and 150 and 220-grit on the other. Spray adhesive works well for this. Since there’s sandpaper on both sides, my sanding board doesn’t slide around on the bench. Check out these small projects!
Historically, woodworkers relied upon the woods native to their region, until transportation and trade innovations made more exotic woods available to the craftsman. Woods are typically sorted into three basic types: hardwoods typified by tight grain and derived from broadleaf trees, softwoods from coniferous trees, and man-made materials such as plywood and MDF.

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Popular and easy to work with, cherry is in high demand for its reddish-brown color and ease of staining and finishing. Cherry likely won’t be at the local home center, but should be at a lumberyard for a somewhat expensive price.[12] This hardwood is a very common material for furniture, and is resistant to normal wear-and-tear, but it is best for indoor pieces.[13]
“I do a lot of finish-sanding freehand, without a sandpaper block, so I can smooth edges and get into nooks and crannies. But the finer grits are usually bonded to thinner paper and, at least for me, the paper is too thin and ends up tearing long before the grit wears out. So I apply duct tape to the back of the sandpaper. The sandpaper is still flexible enough to sand a tight radius and it’s far more durable. You can use this super-strong sandpaper like a shoeshine rag.” — Chuck Merchant

1ª Parte: el participante traerá a mi taller un objeto feo, pasado de moda, roto, que ya no utilice y allí, pondremos en práctica la máxima: “todo se puede cambiar” Trabajaremos en dos grupos, uno el día 2 de abril y otro el 3 de abril, y pondremos a prueba nuestra creatividad para, aplicando diferentes técnicas de restauración, convertirlo en un objeto funcional y muy bonito que volverá de nuevo a nuestras vidas.
Hardwoods are separated into two categories, temperate and tropical hardwoods, depending on their origin. Temperate hardwoods are found in the regions between the tropics and poles, and are of particular interest to wood workers for their cost-effective aesthetic appeal and sustainable sources.[9] Tropical hardwoods are found within the equatorial belt, including Africa, Asia, and South America. Hardwoods flaunt a higher density, around 65lb/cu ft as a result of slower growing rates and is more stable when drying.[9] As a result of its high density, hardwoods are typically heavier than softwoods but can also be more brittle.[9] While there are an abundant number of hardwood species, only 200 are common enough and pliable enough to be used for woodworking.[11] Hardwoods have a wide variety of properties, making it easy to find a hardwood to suit nearly any purpose, but they are especially suitable for outdoor use due to their strength and resilience to rot and decay.[9] The coloring of hardwoods ranges from light to very dark, making it especially versatile for aesthetic purposes. However, because hardwoods are more closely grained, they are typically harder to work than softwoods. They are also harder to acquire in the United States and, as a result, are more expensive.[9]
Este es el diagrama con las dimensiones en centímetros para la construcción de este práctico estante herramientas de carpintería, ebanistería o cualquier otro oficio manual. El estante esta hecho de madera contrachapada y MDF en los separadores del mismo. Este estante esta diseñado para ser colgado en un tablero perforado, tablero de clavijas o "pegboard" como se conoce en inglés, el cua ...
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