Not long ago, I needed to make some angled wood parts to build a new soffit on my garage. I didn’t have the customary tool for the job, but I had some steel joining plates. I screwed through one of the holes in the plate, set my angle, then added another screw to lock the angle. I could then use it as a template to mark all the pieces at the same angle and cut them with my circular saw. — Ryan Bartsch
Antes que nada un gran saludo desde Mexico, me volvi fan de su pagina por lo fasinante de sus proyectos, de hecho inicie con el perchero con mesa de arimo, solo que eligi mal la pintura y tender que destruirlo y volver a comenzar de Nuevo.....ahora este proyecto me gusta mucho y estoy seguro que a mi esposa le va a fasinar, Felicidades por su pagina y consejos. adios
Finally, properly preparing your wood surface is super important. It will make a huge difference when it comes times to stain, paint, or finish your wood. There are a lot of tips for wood surface preparation, but sanding the wood is one of the most important steps. And I find it really helpful to do the bulk of my sanding before I start ripping (cutting) and building with my wood since it’s still in whole pieces. You can check out my simple tips for how to sand wood in my how to stain wood tutorial, which is also good to reference if you need to learn how to stain too!
This self-clamping table saw fence takes only seconds to put on and lets you crank the blade into the fence to create both angled cuts along board edges and extremely thin rip or rabbet cuts. With a hand- or jigsaw, cut pieces from a 1×4, making the inside width of the “L” a hair under the thickness of your saw’s fence. Drill 5/16-in. holes in the L-blocks and plywood fence and join them with two 1/4-in. x 3-in. countersunk machine screws, washers and Wing-Nuts. As always, use extra caution when you’re sawing without a blade guard. Our thanks for this new sawing angle to professional furniture maker George Vondriska. Check out these 16 genius tool hacks you need to know!
Along with stone, clay and animal parts, wood was one of the first materials worked by early humans. Microwear analysis of the Mousterian stone tools used by the Neanderthals show that many were used to work wood. The development of civilization was closely tied to the development of increasingly greater degrees of skill in working these materials.
Hace unos días Julio me dejó un extenso comentario con su opinión sobre qué le parece eso de aprender carpintería a base de leer blogs y ver vídeos en internet. Pensé que este es un buen tema para una entrada del blog, así que copio y pego su comentario (espero no te importe Julio) y después dejo mi contestación. Veréis que no estamos de acuerdo en todo, supongo que porque nuestros caminos y nuestro estado del arte no son los mismos. Si no conocéis su blog, en la intimidad de las virutas reveladas (parece que cerró el blog), pasaros por él. Así podréis comparar dos formas distintas de trabajar y decidir si realizamos el mismo trabajo o son cosas distintas.
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